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Dante’s Lyric Poems

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Translated by Joseph Tusiani, Introduction and notes by Guiseppe Di Scipio. Bilingual format Italian/English, 244 pages.

These poems offer readers wonderful insights into the personality of the great Florentine poet. They are indispensable for an understanding of the Divine Comedy. Joseph Tusiani, the foremost translator of Italian poetry, has done miracles in Dante’s Lyric Poems. Giuseppe Di Scipio’s incisive introduction and copious notes make this volume a must for all students of Dante.

The Divine Comedy: Inferno, Purgatorio, Paradiso (Everyman’s Library, 183)

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Allen Mandelbaum (Translator), Peter Armour (Introduction)

Amazon Reader’s Review: “I am, and have been for many a year, a scholar of the works of Dante. Coming up to date, I have read thousands of translations of the text of all three parts of the Divine Comedy, and this is the best I have found yet. First of all, it is a treat to find that all three parts of this masterwork are collected in this one volume, and even though the price is quite low for a hardcover book with as many pages as this, I cannot stress the quality of this edition. As many may know, Dante Alighieri was a man of great literary prowess, but was given drive by his single obsession to a small girl by the name of Beatrice. She rings true in this work, as the guiding angel, bringing Dante through the depths of hell, the wasteland of Purgatory, and finally, the glory of heaven. This has been one of the most enduring works on the human spirit, and the concept of god as seen through Christianity. Full of pun and metaphor, this is rich in language, and ready to please. Some people start their studies of Epic Poetry with Milton’s “Paradise Lost,” but I say, speaking from experience, that Dante is far superior to Milton, but Milton is in good company as his second. I have read the original in Italian, and this is about as close of a translation as you can get. Please enjoy this.”