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National Geographic Traveler: Piedmont & Northwest Italy, with Turin and the Alps

by Tim Jepson

National Geographic Traveler Piedmont & Northwest Italy begins its tour of the region with an evocative visit to the beautiful baroque city of Turin, site of the 2006 Winter Olympics. It then heads to southern Piedmont with its lush, rolling, vine-covered landscapes, including a stop in the medieval town of Alba. Northeast of Turin, Lake Maggiore and the other lakes offer a mixture of breathtaking scenery and culture that has drawn the rich and famous for centuries. Finally, in the northern mountains, travelers will discover the fabled Valle d’Aosta, a stunning valley featuring fairy-tale castles, Roman remains, and plenty of skiing or hiking. Several detailed sections filled with practical travel information include extensive lists of handpicked hotels and restaurants and insider tips on the best tours. With meticulous maps and lavish photography, the National Geographic Traveler guides ensure exciting and memorable trips.

A Civilized Traveller’s Guide to Turin

by Eugenia Bell

Nestled between the Alps and the Po River, Turin was hailed by Le Corbusier as the most beautifully situated city he’d ever seen, and by Giorgio de Chirico as the “most profound, most enigmatic, most disquieting city not only of Italy, but of the world.” Today Turin, an elegant city of more than a million people, with views of the Alps around every corner, is home to Italy’s most vibrant contemporary art scene, as well as extraordinary architecture, sophisticated shops, and food and wine that are an epicurean’s dream.

Other People’s Trades

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Trained as a chemist in Italy, Levi was deported to Auschwitz in 1944. His experiences in the death camps and his subsequent careers as a chemist, author, and classicist are reflected in this volume of 43 brief, elegant essays on subjects that aroused and amused him: birds, insects, frogs, parasites, pain, sidewalks, Rabelais, imaginary animals, the fear of snakes, qualities common to chess and poetry, children’s games, using a word processor for the first time, going back to school at 60, uncertainty about the future, psychological exams, the language of chemists, obscure writing (German poets Trakl and Celan, both of whom committed suicide). These witty, charming pieces confirm Levi’s position as one of the most gifted writers of our time.

If This Is a Man and The Truce

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With the moral stamina and intellectual pose of a twentieth-century Titan, this slightly built, dutiful, unassuming chemist set out systematically to remember the German hell on earth, steadfastly to think it through, and then to render it comprehensible in lucid, unpretentious prose. He was profoundly in touch with the minutest workings of the most endearing human events and with the most contemptible. Levi was himself a “magically endearing man, the most delicately forceful enchanter I’ve ever known.” – PHILIP ROTH

The Drowned and the Saved

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This book, published months after Italian writer Primo Levi’s apparent suicide, is a small but powerful look at Auschwitz, the hell where Levi was imprisoned during World War II. The book was his third on the subject, following Survival in Auschwitz (1947) and The Reawakening (1963). Removed from the experience by time and age, Levi chose to serve more as an observer of the camp than the passionate young man of his previous work. He writes of “useless violence” inflicted by the guards on prisoners and then concludes the book with a discussion of the Germans who have written to him about their complicity in the event. In all, he tries to make sense of something that – as he knew – made no sense at all.