Other Interests

Books by Steven Saylor

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Steven Saylor is the author of the ROMA SUB ROSA series of historical mysteries featuring Gordianus the Finder, set in the ancient Rome of Cicero, Caesar, and Cleopatra. The latest book is Throne of Caesar, in which Gordianus confronts the Ides of March, 44 B.C., and the most famous murder case in history.

There have also been three prequels—The Seven Wonders, which follows the 18-year-old Gordianus on his journey to the Seven Wonders of the World; Raiders of the Nile, in which young Gordianus, living in Egypt, finds himself drawn into a plot to steal the golden sarcophagus of Alexander the Great; and Wrath of the Furies, in which young Gordianus finds himself in Ephesus on the eve of King Mithridates’ mass slaughter of every Roman man, woman, and child.

Steven is also the author of the international bestseller Roma: The Novel of Ancient Rome and its follow-up, Empire: The Novel of Imperial Rome. These two epic novels comprise a multi-generational saga that spans the first 1200 years of the city, from Iron Age trading post to the height of the empire under Hadrian. A third volume (making this series a trilogy) is on the way.

Click here to purchase books by Steven Saylor.

Books by Lindsey Davis

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Lindsey Davis’ Roman novels begin chronologically with The Course of Honour, the love story of the Emperor Vespasian and Antonia Caenis. Her bestselling mystery series features laid-back First Century detective Marcus Didius Falco and his partner Helena Justina, plus friends, relations, pets and bitter enemy the Chief Spy; there is a reader handboook, Falco: the Official Companion. A new series, featuring Flavia Albia, began in 2013. Master and God, set in the time of the Emperor Domitian, was published in 2012. She has also written an epic novel of the English Civil War and Commonwealth, Rebels and Traitors. She has won the CWA Ellis Peters Historical Dagger, the Dagger in the Library, and a Sherlock award for Falco as Best Comic Detective. She has also been awarded the Premio Colosseo for enhancing the image of Rome, and the CWA Cartier Diamond Dagger for lifetime achievement as a mystery writer.

Click here to purchase books by Lindsey Davis.

Books by Ruth Downie

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Ruth (RS) Downie left university with an English degree and a plan to get married and live happily ever after. She is still working on it. In the meantime she is also the New York Times bestselling author of a mystery series featuring Roman legionary doctor Gaius Petreius Ruso and his British partner, the enigmatic and independent-minded Tilla. Much of what Ruso has been told about Britannia isn’t true. Unfortunately much of what he’s told by Tilla may not be true either. And when it comes to murder, somebody is lying to both of them.

Click here to purchase books by Ruth Downie.

Monte Cassino: The Hardest-Fought Battle of World War II

by Matthew Parker

Monte Cassino is the true story of one of the bitterest and bloodiest of the Allied struggles against the Nazi army. Long neglected by historians, the horrific conflict saw over 350,000 casualties, while the worst winter in Italian memory and official incompetence and backbiting only worsened the carnage and turmoil. Combining groundbreaking research in military archives with interviews with 400 survivors, as well as soldier diaries and letters, Monte Cassino is both profoundly evocative and historically definitive. Clearly and precisely, Matthew Parker brilliantly reconstructs Europe’s largest land battle–which saw the destruction of the ancient monastery of Monte Cassino–and dramatically conveys the heroism and misery of the human face of war.

The Rise of Rome: The Making of the World’s Greatest Empire

by Anthony Everitt

From Anthony Everitt, the bestselling author of acclaimed biographies of Cicero, Augustus, and Hadrian, comes a riveting, magisterial account of Rome and its remarkable ascent from an obscure agrarian backwater to the greatest empire the world has ever known. Emerging as a market town from a cluster of hill villages in the 8th and 7th centuries B.C., Rome grew to become the ancient world’s preeminent power. Everitt fashions the story of Rome’s rise to glory into an erudite page-turner filled with lasting lessons for our time. He chronicles the clash between patricians and plebeians that defined the politics of the Republic. He shows how Rome’s shrewd strategy of offering citizenship to her defeated subjects was instrumental in expanding the reach of her burgeoning empire. And he outlines the corrosion of constitutional norms that accompanied Rome’s imperial expansion, as old habits of political compromise gave way, leading to violence and civil war. In the end, unimaginable wealth and power corrupted the traditional virtues of the Republic, and Rome was left triumphant everywhere except within its own borders. Everitt paints indelible portraits of the great Romans—and non-Romans—who left their mark on the world out of which the mighty empire grew: Cincinnatus, Rome’s George Washington, the very model of the patrician warrior/aristocrat; the brilliant general Scipio Africanus, who turned back a challenge from the Carthaginian legend Hannibal; and Alexander the Great, the invincible Macedonian conqueror who became a role model for generations of would-be Roman rulers. Here also are the intellectual and philosophical leaders whose observations on the art of government and “the good life” have inspired every Western power from antiquity to the present: Cato the Elder, the famously incorruptible statesman who spoke out against the decadence of his times, and Cicero, the consummate orator whose championing of republican institutions put him on a collision course with Julius Caesar and whose writings on justice and liberty continue to inform our political discourse today.

Foreign Bodies: A mystery set in Ancient Rome (A Marcus Corvinus mystery)

by David Wishart

The latest in the wildly popular Marcus Corvinus series takes place in June, during the year 42 AD. The emperor Claudius himself has requested Corvinus’s help investigating the murder of a Gallic wine merchant, stabbed to death whilst taking an afternoon nap in his summer-house at Lugdunum. Not especially happy at being dispatched to Gaul, and even less enamored of his enforced traveling companion, the insufferable Domitius Crinas, Corvinus is increasingly frustrated as it becomes clear that the dead man’s extended family and friends are hiding something from him. Unused to strange Gallic customs and facing an uphill struggle getting anyone to talk freely to a Roman, Corvinus is convinced that there’s more to this murder than meets the eye — but he, a stranger in a strange land — how is he going to prove it?

Ovid (Marcus Corvinus Book 1)

by David Wishart

When young aristocratic layabout Marcus Corvinus is approached by the stepdaughter of the exiled and now dead Roman poet Ovid and asked to clear the return of the ashes for burial, he cheerfully agrees; there should, he thinks, be no problem. Except when he makes the application to the imperial authorities it’s turned down flat. So what, Corvinus asks himself, did Ovid do that was so bad that they won’t even allow his bones back into Italy? This is the first book in the Marcus Corvinus series.

 

The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Rome

by Chris Scarre

More than 15 centuries after its fall, the Roman Empire remains one of the most formative influences on the history of Europe. Its physical remains dot the landscape from Scotland to Syria. Its cities are still the great metropolises of the continent. Its law and institutions have shaped modern practice, and its ideal of a united Europe has haunted politicians ever since. Fully illustrated and featuring more than 60 full-color maps, this atlas traces the rise and fall of the first great multinational state. It looks at its provinces and cities, its trade and economy, its armies and frontier defenses; follows its foreign ward and internecine struggles; and charts its transformation into a Christian theocracy and its fall in 476.

Fall of the Roman Republic (Penguin Classics)

by Plutarch, Rex Warner (Translator)

Dramatic artist, natural scientist and philosopher, Plutarch is widely regarded as the most significant historian of his era, writing sharp and succinct accounts of the greatest politicians and statesmen of the classical period. Deeply influential on Shakespeare and many other later writers, they continue to fascinate today with their exploration of corruption, decadence and the struggle for ultimate power. Taken from The Lives, a series of biographies spanning the Graeco-Roman age, this collection illuminates the twilight of the old Roman Republic from 157-43 BC. Whether describing the would-be dictators Marius and Sulla, the battle between Crassus and Spartacus, the death of political idealist Crato, Julius Caesar’s harrowing triumph in Gaul or the eloquent oratory of Cicero, Plutarch offers a fascinating insight into an empire wracked by political divisions.

Rome: A Cultural, Visual and Personal History

by Robert Hughes

For almost 1000 years, Rome held sway as the spiritual and artistic center of the world. Hughes vividly recreates the ancient Rome of Julius Caesar, Marcus Aurelius, Nero, Caligula, Cicero, Martial and Virgil. With the artistic blossoming of the Renaissance, he casts his unwavering critical eye over the great works of Raphael, Michelangelo and Brunelleschi, shedding new light on the Old Masters. In the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries, when Rome’s cultural predominance was assured, artists and tourists from all over Europe converged on the city. Hughes brilliantly analyses the defining works of Caravaggio, Velasquez, Rubens and Bernini.